Friday, July 03, 2020

The True Story Behind ‘Berkshire's UFO’ in 1969 Revealed in Netflix's ‘Unsolved Mysteries’

The True Story Behind ‘Berkshire's UFO’ in 1969 Revealed in Netflix's ‘Unsolved Mysteries’



An Unidentified Flying Object! Wow, what is that? That thought may have been in minds of the four families from Great Barrington, Sheffield, Stockbridge and Egremont

     "Guess what, years ago — I saw it... All these years, we never spoke of it." The eerie tale begins on the evening of September 1, 1969, when an unexplained phenomenon occurred in Berkshire County, Massachusetts and the residents
By Jyotsna Basotia meaww.com
7-3-20
recalled baffling, terrifying experience with UFO sightings. Netflix's reboot of 'Unsolved Mysteries' delves deeper into one night that changed four different lives.

Thursday, July 02, 2020

Core Secrets UFO Memo: “It’s All Fiction,” Says Former DIA Director Thomas Wilson

Core Secrets UFO Memo – “It’s All Fiction,” Says Former DIA Director Thomas Wilson


Eric who? — the Admiral

     The admiral at the center of controversial notes describing his inability to access a classified UFO research program says the documents are bogus. Furthermore, he says the alleged author of those notes, physicist Dr. Eric Davis, never interviewed him.

“It’s all fiction,” says former Defense Intelligence Agency Director Thomas Wilson, from his home in Virginia. “I wouldn’t know Eric Davis if he walked in right now.”
Billy Cox
By Billy Cox
De Void
6-15-20

Vice Admiral Thomas
“My memory is not foggy. Of all the stuff on the Internet, the only thing which is accurate is, I did have a meeting with (Edgar) Mitchell in ’97 or ’98, when I was Vice-2″ — Vice Admiral Thomas
Posted on Imgur last year, the 15 pages of typed notes, often referred to now as the Core Secrets memo, were presented as the rough transcripts of a conversation between Wilson, shortly after retiring from the Navy, and Davis, on 10/16/02. The nut graph of Core Secrets, if true, would confirm some of the darkest suspicions about the UFO phenomenon – that research is being undertaken and walled off by private contractors, to the extent that not even insiders at the most elite levels of military intelligence have the proper security clearances to review the evidence.

Davis, who famously researches the sorts of exotic technology often observed in UFO behaviors, has never affirmed or denied his ostensible authorship of Core Secrets when pressed over the past year. He did, however, tell the New York Post in May that the documents were leaked by the estate of the late astronaut and Apollo 14 moonwalker Dr. Edgar Mitchell.

But in his first public statement on Core Secrets, Wilson rejected the entire premise of the meeting and his role in it. The notes indicate that Wilson and Davis rendezvoused in Las Vegas, inside a car attended by three uniformed military personnel, in the parking lot of the Special Projects Building of defense contractor EG&G. “I’m not saying that sometime, somewhere, I never met (Davis), but I certainly don’t know him, I don’t remember him, and I definitely did not sit with him in a car for an hour in Las Vegas,” Wilson told De Void.

“You may also see in those notes where I came with two other naval officers, a lieutenant and a lieutenant commander, and a petty officer who was driving the car. I was not even in the Navy then. And the Navy was certainly not ferrying me around in a car at that point.

“Those notes are really detailed – it’s like somebody wrote a fiction piece,” Wilson said. “But it never happened, trust me. There are so many things in those notes that are demonstrably inaccurate. And I don’t know how I could prove it, but I haven’t been to Las Vegas since 1979, 80.”

Wilson said he hadn’t gotten around to reading the Core Secrets docs until someone brought them to his attention within the past week or so. He said his catch-up crash course included watching researcher Richard Dolan’s YouTube overview of the contents and their implications. Wilson called that synopsis “silly.”

One thing in the notes that is true, Wilson added, is that he and Mitchell did meet face to face. Wilson said he couldn’t remember the date, but Core Secrets alleges the meeting occurred in 1997, when Wilson was Vice Director of Intelligence for the Joint Chiefs of Staff, shortly before becoming the DIA director. He acknowledged that the subject of UFOs and special access programs did come up. But he reiterated what he told De Void in 2008, that he wasn’t interested in going down that rabbit hole.

“I don’t remember the details, but they [Mitchell was accompanied by UFO researcher Steven Greer] said there would be evidence in black programs, and would I be interested in chasing it down,” Wilson said. “I told them I had far too many things to do.

“I’m not saying there are no such programs because I don’t know. I didn’t check or follow up. It might not have been a waste of time for somebody (to pursue), but I did not have time to waste, believe me. At the time I was up to my eyeballs in Bosnia and Kosovo and Korea and Iraq and, you name it, terrorism. So I didn’t feel I should spend my time — well, I had enough black programs I had to deal with.”

In 1996, Mitchell told me he was pursuing leads that UFO “information is now held primarily by a body of semi- or quasi-private organizations that have kinda spun off from the military intelligence organizations of the past.” He called those arrangements “dangerous” and added:
“Imagine an organization that has a black budget, an unquestioned source of funds, reports to no one, and has this exotic technology that they can keep to themselves and play with.” He also said that if NASA had prior knowledge “of ET contact existing within the government, and we were sent into space blind and dumb to such information, I think it is a case of criminal culpability.”
Mitchell repeated some of those allegations in 2008 on CNN’s Larry King Live. Without mentioning Wilson, Mitchell said he had talked with “an admiral” who “had found the people responsible for the cover-up and for the people who were in the know and were told, I’m sorry, admiral, you do not have need to know here and so, goodbye.”

Upon learning 12 years ago that Wilson had immediately rejected those allegations, Mitchell said he was “shocked,” but he refused to challenge the discrepancy. “I do not wish to engage him on this matter,” Mitchell said.

Wilson’s repudiation of the Core Secrets narrative is consistent with what a handful of his contemporaries – either mentioned in the Core Secrets notes or involved in the relevant chain of command in 1997 – have told De Void.

Former Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist Oke Shannon, former Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Noel Longuemare, former Vice Chair of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and USAF Gen. Joe Ralston, and former Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics Dr. Paul Kaminsky, have all stated they have no knowledge of the Core Secrets version of events.

As to the broader subject of UFOs, Wilson remains skeptical. Over the course of his long military career, Wilson said he knew of countless initially unusual sightings that turned out to have prosaic explanations, many of them submarines. But the Pentagon’s recent verification of videos showing F-18s in pursuit of UFOs have lowered his guard somewhat.

“I looked at those Navy videos with some interest,” he said. “I don’t know what they saw. It’s interesting, for sure.”

Eric Davis could not be reached for comment.

Tuesday, June 30, 2020

Roswell’s UFO Festival (2020) To Go On Virtually

Roswell’s UFO Festival To Go On Virtually


     The COVID-19 pandemic has forced some of the biggest events in New Mexico to cancel. The UFO Festival was scheduled to take place this weekend before it was canceled. However, Roswell is still going forward with a different kind of festival.

By Corey King www.krqe.com 6-29-20
“I’m just really blown away by the positive, the positivity you know,” said Marie Manning. MainStreet Roswell, the organizers for the UFO Festival said even though they are not allowed to hold the traditional festival that everyone is used to, they have decided to hold a virtual one instead.

Luis Elizondo Responds to The Senate’s Vote on UFOs – VIDEO

Luis Elizondo Responds to The Senate’s Vote on UFOs

     The former head of the Pentagon's UFO program (AATIP), Luis Elizondo, appeared on the Tucker Carlson show, with guest host Brian Kilmeade to offer his views of the recent news
By Fox News 6-26-20
concerning the Senate Intelligence Committee's vote to publicize classified UFO data.

[...]

Brian Kilmeade: Luis, if the Senate gets what they want what will they get?

Luis Elizondo: I think this is a historical moment in our country for many reasons. I think it's fair to say that this certainly is a nonpartisan issue. Thanks to the courage of Senator Marco Rubio but others before him, such as Harry Reid and Stevens and Inouye ... I think if the Senate is successful in getting what they want, they're going to get actual hard data as to the capabilities of these incursions into our airspace and the airspace ... of where we have combat vehicles ... hopefully we can get a better understanding of what's going on here. These things seem to appear and operate without impunity both here in the United States and overseas, where our brave men in and women are in uniform and hopefully we'll finally be able to piece this together.

Brian Kilmeade: Luis, how do you know?

Luis Elizondo: Well, because I was part of a program for about ten years back in the Pentagon called AATIP. I ran that program with several colleagues of mine, and it was an inter-agency organization very much like this task force that you are seeing right now that's being proposed in this bill.

 Brian Kilmeade: What's the most intriguing thing that we'll get from it, if the Senate Intelligence Committee gets what you know?

 Luis Elizondo: Hopefully, you're gonna get an unclassified report, and for the first time average Americans are going to get a chance to see the very same data that has been locked away if you will in classified briefings and what not, and hopefully see the light of day for once.

Brian Kilmeade: Now, I consider myself an average American, can you tell me what is says, since you part of the unit?

Luis Elizondo: Well, unfortunately, I'm not employed by the U.S. government anymore, and I'm still bound by my non-disclosure agreements, my NDA's I still have a security clearance ... so that's really a conversation that the U.S. government's going to have to have ... the executive branch with the legislative branch and then finally decide what they think is appropriate for the American people. I think what I can is that data is very compelling. And when you look at these vehicles and what they're able to do, you very quickly realize that this is probably not something in our own inventory.


 See Also: 



Sunday, June 28, 2020

US Navy ‘UFO Task Force’ Exists, and Senator Rubio Wants Its Data

US Navy ‘UFO Task Force’ Exists, and Senator Rubio Wants Its Data


     The Office of Naval Intelligence has an “Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon Task Force,” and U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio is requesting a detailed analysis of their findings.

By Justin Sedgwick www.fox10phoenix.com 6-26-20
The reveal of both the task force’s existence, as well as Rubio’s data request, came in a June 17 Select Committee on Intelligence report authored by Rubio on the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021.

The report states that the committee supports the efforts of the task force to collect and standardize data regarding “unidentified aerial phenomenon (UFOs), as well as their links to foreign governments and potential threats.”

Friday, June 26, 2020

Unprecedented Public Report On UFOs Requested From Senate Intel Committee

Unprecedented Public Report On UFOs Requested From Senate Intel Committee

Lawmakers want to know what data exists, how it's shared, what threats
these craft might pose, and if an adversary has new breakthrough tech.


     Members of the U.S. Senate have expressed concern that the U.S. military, as well as other federal government agencies, have not been giving the appropriate amount of attention to reports of encounters with unidentified aerial phenomena, or
By Joseph Trevithick The War Zone 6-23-20
UAP, more commonly referred to as unidentified flying objects, or UFOs, which may be linked to America's adversaries. They are now looking to order the Director of National Intelligence to work with other relevant agencies to produce a report detailing just what information they have on UAPs already, how that data is collected and processed, how it is getting shared, and just what kind of threats or other risks these objects might pose.

The call for the UAP review was included in a report accompanying a draft of the Intelligence Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 that Senator Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican, submitted on behalf of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence on June 17, 2020.

The US Navy Has a 'UFO Task Force,' As Confirmed By The Senate Intelligence Committee

The US Navy Has a 'UFO Task Force,' As Confirmed By Senate Intelligence Committee


Marco Rubio wants a "detailed analysis of unidentified aerial phenomena data and intelligence reporting collected or held by the Office of Naval Intelligence, including data and intelligence reporting held by the Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force."
     The Senate Intelligence Committee wants the Director of National Intelligence and the Secretary of Defense to create a comprehensive, unclassified report concerning unidentified aerial phenomena upon the passing of a Senate appropriations bill initiated by Senator Marco Rubio, Motherboard has learned.
By MJ Banias and Tim McMillan
Vice
6-23-20

A recent Senate Intelligence Committee report on the bill, which concerns funding the government's intelligence activities, recommended its passing. It also asked for a “detailed analysis of unidentified aerial phenomena data and intelligence reporting collected or held by the Office of Naval Intelligence, including data and intelligence reporting held by the Unidentified Aerial Phenomena Task Force.”

US Senate Committee Aims To Regulate UFO Information

US Senate Committee Aims To Regulate UFO Information



     The US Senate intelligence committee is aiming to regulate a Pentagon UFO program so that the public is better informed of its activities and the country's intelligence branches can more easily share information.
By phys.org
6-24-20

The panel said that it "supports the efforts of the Unidentified Aerial Phenomenon Task Force," officially confirming the program's continued existence, in a provision to the annual intelligence authorization bill.

The Senate Intelligence Committee Votes On Public Analysis of UFOs

The Senate Intelligence Committee Votes On Public Analysis of UFOs



Senators want the public to see the government's UFO reports

"This issue has lacked attention from senior leaders," the Senate Intelligence Committee says.

     The Senate Intelligence Committee has voted to require U.S. intelligence agencies and the Defense Department to compile a detailed public analysis of all data collected on "unidentified aerial phenomenon," including intrusions recorded by Navy pilots in recent years.
By Bryan Bender
www.politico.com
6-23-20

The provision contained in the annual intelligence authorization bill, which still needs to be adopted by the full Senate, sets up an unusually public debate on Capitol Hill about how extensively the government has been tracking high performance aircraft of unknown origin, or UFOs.

Thursday, June 25, 2020

UFO Research Integrity

UFO Research Integrity



     Logic suggests explanations requiring the least number of hypothetical scenarios are often most feasible. Smart money goes with the most likely, least complex models when ranking possibilities.

In UFO circles we frequently lose sight of most likely explanations. Part of the reason may be because so much time is devoted to imagining the extraordinary. We tend to gravitate towards believing what we hear the most, no matter how often it may be properly framed as supposition. It's difficult to keep things in perspective when a 15-second disclaimer is followed
Jack Brewer
By Jack Brewer
The UFO Trail
6-15-20
by an hour of podcast speculation. Squeaky wheels get oil, even when delivered through sources such as fictional movies and television shows.

We often suspect the existence of hidden agendas - conspiracies, if you will - within the UFO genre because it can be so difficult to accept select researchers and organizations are as incompetent and credulous as they appear. Did the Roswell Slides promoters truly think that mummified Native American was a crash-landed visitor from the stars? Did Dr. Steven Greer really think that Atacama skeleton was an alien and did he and Dr. Garry Nolan honestly not understand the ethical concerns that would arise over their handling of it? Did Robert Bigelow and a team of consultants think there was scientific merit in hiring "security guards" to reportedly play with alleged voice phenomena and conduct similar occult practices? (That last scenario was apparently funded by your tax dollars.)

Could they have all sincerely had such poor judgement? Such reasonable questions abound.

The infamous Roswell Slides telltale placard
The infamous Roswell Slides telltale placard

We might consider that, from a perspective of assessing research integrity, answers to the above questions don't really make that much difference. The integrity of research is weakened when investigators fail to respect and adhere to universally recognized protocols and codes of ethics. No matter what their agendas, their research is not reliable if they must incorporate numerous hypothetical scenarios into forming their arguments. We really don't need to know what personally motivated David Jacobs and if he is as obliviously incompetent as he seems in order to accurately identify his ethics failings and resulting poor quality of research. This means we don't learn anything of value, at least not about alleged paranormal experiences, from such material, and we are at high risk of absorbing and exposing others to incorrect information. Meanwhile, people are harmed and justifiably offended in the process of such examples as named thus far.

Paul Carr is a spacecraft systems engineer who facilitates several science-friendly podcasts. In response to request for comment on research integrity, Carr replied that he considers virtues of UFO research to include patience, humility, integrity and skepticism. Carr directs Aerial Phenomena Investigations (API), a UFO research group with a track record of commitments to evidence-based investigation and ethical treatment of UFO witnesses. He says the two go hand in hand.

"UFO research primarily deals with human memories," Carr stated, "and it has become clear to us at API that while the ethical treatment of witnesses and an open, honest, and careful approach to collecting and analyzing data are not the same thing, they are both members of a healthy body of research practice. Whatever threatens to corrupt one also threatens the other. Willful abuse of facts and fallacious reasoning readily metastasizes into abuses of innocent persons. This isn't something that just happens to organizations. It is a choice they make.

"It's not that we won't make mistakes - we will. It's what you do and how you change after a mistake is made that is the best marker of integrity."

Perhaps Robert Bigelow and his various teams assembled over the years have been unjustly saddled with conspiracy theories. It is possible they are simply as credulous as they seem to want us to believe.

Substantial resources were poured into a Utah ranch. Claims of extraordinary creatures, portals to other dimensions, and various sensational happenings, the vast majority of which purportedly defied any kind of significant documentation, became the stuff of legends. Maybe the involved credentialed researchers sincerely do not understand the inherent problems in expecting others to embrace their unverified claims. Maybe they are truly that blinded by belief.

The Typhoid Mary-like innocence of claimed ignorance meets large problems when issues of fully informed consent arise. This was not only the case at the Skinwalker Ranch, as former security guards expressed concerns over their apparent unwitting involvement in state-funded research, but was a key component of the infamous Carpenter Affair as well.

Maybe John Carpenter, Robert Bigelow, John Alexander, John Schuessler and others were truly oblivious to the ethical minefield of covertly supplying Bigelow's National Institute for Discovery Science (NIDS) with information discussed between therapist and clients. Data and recordings of hypnosis sessions from some 140 case files were obtained for about 100 bucks apiece. Maybe some of the people involved in facilitating and concealing the transaction just didn't see publicly addressing the circumstances and voicing objections as feasible options. Obviously not, given their stances of mostly silence and aversion to questions.

Perhaps some of them honestly believed the potential research gains outweighed the liabilities and betrayals. Maybe they honestly misunderstood and vastly overestimated the minimal scientific value of a collection of hypnosis-induced accounts of alien abduction. Such missteps are magnified when the parties claim to be conducting scientific study, as was the case.

Such scenarios, regardless of motive and intent, border dangerously on mad scientist territory. Codes of ethics are designed, in part, to deter researchers afflicted with delusions of self-importance from sacrificing human welfare during an incorrectly perceived pursuit of historic breakthroughs. This widely eludes much of the UFO genre and particularly its pro-hypnosis segment. Virtually anything appears deemed worth the cost of chasing an alien abduction carrot which has consistently remained out of reach.

"The importance of ethics in research integrity is that it creates the ground level from which all of your work is built," explained Dr. Christopher Cogswell, who holds a PhD in Chemical Engineering and co-hosts a popular podcast which explores fringe topics from reasoned perspectives. "If the ground isn't stable, then everything else you generate or say becomes built on a shaky foundation, which can easily be toppled by the first critical look at your methods and history. It is OK to be wrong or make a mistake, we are all human. But to continue despite evidence of mismanagement, error, or unethical practice makes your entire body of work suspect and tinged with that lens."

We could carry our line of considerations to its chronological next steps, the Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program (AATIP) and the resulting To The Stars Academy (TTSA). Maybe intelligence professionals such as Luis Elizondo and Christopher Mellon are simply overly enthusiastic about the UFO topic and don't understand the problematic nature of trying to turn film clips into proof of the extraordinary. Perhaps Elizondo was simply too inexperienced at UFO investigation to adequately assess an extremely questionable case he and the seemingly ultra credulous Tom DeLonge highlighted on cable television. Maybe there's just an overwhelming amount of UFO history for Elizondo to learn, and maybe it simply never occurred to him to secure receipts that could answer questions about his background before he went to TTSA and started making claims he was apparently unprepared to adequately address if questioned.

Maybe shelling out 35 grand for Art's Parts will prove brilliant. Perhaps the group's collection of alleged metal alloys, UAP fragments, or whatever the current going designation is will lead to paradigm-shifting discoveries. And, if not, maybe it all happened for no other reasons than none of the TTSA personnel knew any better.

An obvious problem with AATIP is it consisted of Robert Bigelow and some of his perpetual cast members. This is not necessarily a negative thing in itself, but from a perspective of integrity of research, it is only prudent to question the effectiveness of the work of investigators who spent decades apparently more dedicated to belief than time-tested protocols. That's the case, anyway, if we are to believe their past indiscretions, as already described, resulted entirely from simple error. Again, it doesn't matter from an integrity of research standpoint whether they are incompetent or have ulterior motives when the outcome chronically produces nothing of significant scientific value.

As may have been the case with issues surrounding the security personnel at Skinwalker and the exploited hypnosis subjects of John Carpenter, perhaps it was poor understandings and lack of foresight that contributed to the Bigelow-facilitated covert funneling of DIA funds into MUFON. Maybe Bigelow, Schuessler, and none of the involved parties realized the problematic nature of an intelligence agency funding a 501(c)(3) UFO organization while concealing the fact from the rest of its governing board members and the public at large.
Hal Puhoff, Kit green, Russell Targ, Pat Price (Remote Viewing) 1973
Some of the boys in the Remote Viewing band. And NIDS.
And Skinwalker. And BAASS. And AATIP. And TTSA.
This isn't about people who may possibly be influenced by false memories or misidentify an exotic aircraft. We're not discussing individuals who experience some kind of event(s) they don't understand and go in search of answers. We're talking about credentialed scientists and professional intelligence personnel who in some cases subscribe to irresponsibly unsupported beliefs and flawed research methodologies, sometimes while under the commission of United States government grant funds.

It seems more than clear to this writer that, if we give all these people the benefit of the doubt and take them at their implied word, we should fully expect to scrutinize their opinions at length and have their research claims painstakingly verified before fully accepting them. Such investigators apparently, at best, suffer from recurring episodes of rather astoundingly poor judgement.

The good news is we don't have to rely on personalities and popularity as tools for assessing research. Its merit or lack thereof should be self-evident.

The fact will always remain that should some yet to be proven assertions turn out to be correct, they're indeed not established yet. Just because the future may show something to be accurate, that does not in any way mean you should currently exempt it from reasonable fact-checking. That's how we find out if it's true.

It is important we know the difference between facts and claims asserted by investigators, hold them accountable, and commit ourselves to respecting ethical standards and best practices as recognized by the professional research community. Integrity of UFO research, and ultimately what people believe is flying around up there, depend on it.

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